SAVING WATER

Now’s the time to mulch ready for spring, before the sun starts to shine down onto the bare soil. Mulching can also help to put healthy nutrients such as nitrogen back in the soil, and increase water retention in time for summer.

Late winter is a great time to consider new planting in the garden. Plants that have been dormant and are starting wake up with warmer soil, and better still, the soil is soft and easy to work with. Increased rainfall in the southern states of Australia can help naturally establish plant life. Ensure you have a consistent program for watering for the initial first few months, then, if you’ve planted the right species, you can turn the tap off once establishment takes place. Using the right plants can adapt a landscape to survive off rainfall alone, such as with Banksia robur.

On balconies or in semi-sheltered areas, consider utilising the many self watering or wicking planters that are now available. These gives a plant’s roots more frequent availability to water, which is especially helpful for situations where rainfall is limited or not available.

Legendary Local Landscape Designer Phillip Withers. Photo – Amelia Stanwix.

The Yarraview garden, where Phillip and team planned their installation for The 2020 Melbourne International Flower + Garden Show, which sadly did not go ahead! Photo – Amelia Stanwix.

Phil at one of his favourite places, Point Addis. Photo – Amelia Stanwix.

Banksia marginata. Photography – Amelia Stanwix.

Photo – Amelia Stanwix.

Photo – Amelia Stanwix.

Photography – Amelia Stanwix.

Photo – Shutterstock, courtesy of Phillip Withers.

Photo – Amelia Stanwix.

Photo – Amelia Stanwix.

Correa Reflexa (also known as ‘native fuschia’). Photography – Amelia Stanwix.

Callistemon and Grevillea.Photography – Amelia Stanwix.

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