To say that the world has been rocked this year is an understatement. The global pandemic has shifted our priorities inwards to the home, and given a sharp focus on what really matters. We’re all looking at our homes in a totally new light.

The current mood has us cocooning at home, where we want to celebrate the simple things. More than ever, our home is our sanctuary, and we need to feel connected, so we crave earthy, natural elements. We’re looking for honesty in design. The wabi-sabi ideas of finding beauty in imperfection and impermanence are really resonating right now, and our homes can reflect this feeling. Whilst these ideas have been showing in interiors for the past few years (you can read about Japanese design here), it seems that the current climate is accelerating the trend for a handcrafted, layered and textural home.

The home of Emma Lane, featuring a custom cement and sand render, with pigment added for an environmentally friendly, truly unique finish! Photography – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files. Styling – Annie Portelli

The award winning ‘Budge Over Dover’ project by YSG Studio in Sydney features extensive use of Venetian Plaster, on both walls and ceilings. Photo – Prue Ruscoe.

YSG Studio’s ‘Budge Over Dover’ project features pigmented Venetian Plaster on both walls and ceilings. Photo – Prue Ruscoe.

The home of Barb Hyman in Melbourne features textured limewashed walls, for an old-world feel. Photography – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files. Styling – Annie Portelli

The home of Arabella and Chris Wilson features mud-rendered, painted internal walls. Photography – Eve Wilson for The Design Files.

Home of Georgia Ezra (Tiles of Ezra). Photo – Amelia Stanwix.

A lime wash paint was used to achieve this soft, velvety texture in the Balnarring home of Kate Dinon. Photo – Rhiannon Taylor. Styling – Chelsea Hing.

The incredible home of Emma Lane. featuring a custom cement and sand render, with pigment added for an environmentally friendly, truly unique finish! Photography – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files. Styling – Annie Portelli

Rendered, textural walls in the Sydney home of William and Julia Dangar. Photography – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files. Styling – Annie Portelli

Left: collections of handcrafted and vintage ceramics in the home of Emma Lane. Right: Travertine bedside table in the home of Alex Bennet. Photography – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files. Styling – Annie Portelli.

Bedrock display case for Future Collective. Photo – Pip Newell.

Den Holm Australian limestone sculpture in the home of Melissa Marshall. Photography – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files. Styling – Annie Portelli

American oak and travertine coffee table designed by David Harrison of Design Daily and made by Cranbrook Workshop. Photo – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files. Styling – Annie Portelli.

A rendered chest of drawers adds texture in the home of Tamsin Johnson. Photography – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files. Styling – Annie Portelli

Limestone sculptures by Lucas Wearne of Neighbourhood Studio. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

A travertine table in the home of Alex Bennet. Photography – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files. Styling – Annie Portelli.

the supremely textural home of Georgia Ezra (Tiles of Ezra)! Photo – Amelia Stanwix.

Texture on show in the home of Georgia Ezra (Tiles of Ezra). Photo – Amelia Stanwix.

Home of Georgia Ezra (Tiles of Ezra). Photo – Amelia Stanwix.

An eclectic mix of handmade tile and textural wallpaper in the Melbourne home of Alex Mccabe. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Annie Portelli.

Chalky, textural walls and terracotta tiles floors in the home of Emma Lane. Photography – Caitlin Mills for The Design Files. Styling – Annie Portelli

Inexpensive stone tiles achieve a similar aesthetic to a slab of stone or marble – at a fraction of the cost! Seen here in The Dairy by Andrea Moore. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Andrea Moore.

The Dairy by Andrea Moore. Photo – Eve Wilson. Styling – Andrea Moore.

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