Liam Fleming, Graft Vase Series

Though appearing separate, each mould-blown elements of these cubic glass vases is actually a distinct part,  fused with another to create a single, stacked body. To make these asymmetrical, geometric pieces, Liam Fleming uses the traditional incalmo (meaning ‘graft’ in a Venetian dialect) technique, wherein two or more elements made of different coloured glass are melded together to create one solid vessel. This process allow Liam to experiment with colour combinations in a contemporary composition, while still retaining a continuous form.

Liam draws on the colour theories of twentieth century artists Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee and Piet Mondrian to explore how colour and form can aesthetically express the tempo of music. He makes all pieces with his assistant, Alex Valero, in Adelaide!

Siân Boucherd, Oyster Shell

This decorative sculpture is woven from organic fibres and mimics the flow of moving water.

In this self-initiated project, Siân Boucherd uses traditional basketry techniques to create a contemporary, amorphous form. The art object was made from raw raffia, hemp, sisal and wool which had been ethically or sustainably sourced. The soft, billowing shape recalls ancient natural formations which have been chiselled with the ebb and flow of time.

Liam Fleming, Graft Vase Series. Photo – Grant Hancock. Siân Boucherd, Oyster Shell. Photo – Yvonne Doherty.

Tantri Mustika, Lithify. Photo – Boby Corica. Szilvassy, Aether. Photo – Emily Weaving.

Daisy Watt and Samantha Seary, Holding Light. Photo – Daisy Watts.

James Lemon, Pest Chairs. Photo – James Lemon. Kirsten Perry, The Lost Homes of Soft Boiled Beings. Photo – Kirsten Perry.

Georgina Proud, Glass Houses. Photo – Georgina Proud.

Cut Throat Knives, Imprint. Photo – Rebecca Newman. Tjunkaya Tapaya of Tjanpi Desert Weavers, Tjanpi Teapot. Photo – Isobel Egan.

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